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Upcycled Candle Sticks Using Clarinet Parts

Junk King Upcycled Clarinet Candlesticks, photo by Caryn

Junk King Upcycled Clarinet Candlesticks, photo by Caryn

Junk Lady was going though boxes and found one all chockablock with old clarinet parts. After attempting to assemble one working instrument and failing I got to thinking what non-musical way they could be recycled. CLARINET CANDLESTICKS!

Wacky Wednesday – TPAC Art-O-Mat

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

Our first visit to TPAC, the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, brought many delights: the show, the architecture, the artwork and statues in expected and unexpected places, and the Art-O-Mat. After explaining to our daughter what a cigarette machine was, we both agreed it was a fantastic and productive up cycle. Placing $5.00 in this Art-O-Mat machine gave the patron a choice from a selection of palm-sized hand-made artwork from around the country. I say ‘patron’ because the proceeds go to support the TPAC Education Fund.

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

On further investigation we learned that the Art-O-Mat is not unique to TPAC. There are Art-O-Mats all over the country, with one of the newest being unveiled at Alfred University in New York State this week. Clark Whittington of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the founder and creator of Art-O-Mat, will be speaking about his work at Alfred University on March 19th.

Art-O-Mat continues to search for more artists to represent in their machines. There are very specific perimeters and uniform packaging – about the size of  pack of cigarettes. Here are the detailed guidelines. Once a prototype is accepted the artist needs to have at least 50 items together and ready to ship to one of the cities housing an Art-O-Matic machine. Usual price is $5.00 and once sold the artist will receive $2.50.

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

ARTOMAT at TPAC, Photo by Caryn

4 Table Legs + 1 Vintage Suitcase = Table

photo by caryn of parts to make table

Photo by Caryn of parts to make table

My job is to sort through items that we haul to see what needs to be recycled and what can still be used. I was excited to see this vintage 1960’s suitcase and four lonely table legs come in within the same week. Both trucks were on jobs and I had a few minutes. The table legs had screws already attached to the ends so I only needed a measuring device and a drill.

photo by caryn of the finished project and tools

Photo by Caryn of Finished Project and Tools

Could not readily find a yardstick so I used a musket loader that was handy. (If you saw our warehouse you’d realize that many things are within reach – except yard sticks.) I used the straight piece of metal to measure equally from each corner and drilled a pilot hole for the screws already on the table leg, screwed in the legs and adjusted tightly until the suitcase top was level. Done.

Note these are not the sturdiest of tables. I’d put a few books and other non-breakables on top, but even a small dog or large cat with the right determination could topple it and any breakables would meet the floor. Four horizontal reinforcements between the legs would make Granny’s favorite lamp a bit more safe.


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